Admissions Requirements

Lower Division refers to students who are enrolled as pre-business majors. Upper Division refers to students who have met the impaction criteria and have declared an upper division major.

Required Courses in the Major

Required Courses in the Pre-Business Major

All students wishing to major in Business are admitted to SDSU as pre-business majors. Students usually spend the first half of their college work (whether at SDSU or another college) working on the pre-business impaction requirements.

Students must meet the following impaction criteria to be admitted to an upper division business major:

FOR APPLICANTS NOT CURRENTLY EMPLOYED BY SDSU: Select "New & Returning Job Seekers". The Careers page will display all the open Staff positions with the University. Applicants can select any one job or multiple jobs that they are interested in by selecting the check box next to the job title(s). Once a job has been selected the applicant can scroll down to the bottom of the list and select on "Apply Now". If applicants have not already registered or logged in to their profile they will be prompted to do so at this time.

CURRENT EMPLOYEES: Select "Current Employees & Student Assistants, then select "Self Service" in the menu, then select "Careers". The Careers page will display all the open Staff positions with the University. Applicants can select any one job or multiple jobs that they are interested in by selecting the check box next to the job title(s). Once a job has been selected, scroll down to the bottom of the list and select "Apply Now".

The following 9 prep courses (8 for Accounting majors) with a C or better in each (no C- and no CR/NC grades allowed)

  • ACCTG 201: Financial Accounting
  • ACCTG 202: Managerial Accounting
  • ECON 101: Principles of Economics (Macro)
  • ECON 102: Principles of Economics (Micro)
  • FIN 240: Legal Environment of Business
  • MIS 180: Principles of Information Systems
  • RWS 290: Business Communications (formerly BA 290; not required for Accounting majors)
  • MATH 120 or MATH 150: Calculus for Business Analysis
  • STAT 119 or ECON 201: Elementary Statistics for Business or Statistical Methods

If you took or are currently enrolled in one or more of these courses at another school, the course you took must be approved by SDSU as equivalent to the SDSU course before you can declare your upper division major. Please visit www.sdsu.edu/tap for course equivalencies.

Please be sure your SDSU Degree Evaluation (Degree Audit) is viewable online before you declare upper-division. If you cannot access it from your WebPortal please visit the Office of Advising and Evaluations, SSW 1551. This Evaluation must show the grades that you earned in your prep courses.

If you meet the requirements to declare an upper division major you should visit the Business Advising Center (EBA 448, phone 619-594-5828) during the declaration period, which can be found in the Important Dates section of the Fowler's College of Business Admissions Page.

Note: You will need to bring a copy of your degree evaluation if you can not view it via webportal. The Academic Advising Center (SSW 1551) can print a copy for you.

Choose your major and catalog year from the list below.

In general, your catalog year is the year you began at SDSU as a pre-business major. If you entered SDSU as another major, your catalog year is the year you changed your major to Business. (Declaring an upper division major does not change your catalog year.)

Major

International Business

International Business is a joint major between the College of Arts and Letters and the Fowler College of Business. Requirements for declaring a major in International Business differ from those for Business. Consult the International Business Office for more information.

Minors in the Fowler College of Business

The minors in the Fowler College of Business are intended to give students a structured introduction to a specific area of Business Administration. Students who wish to minor in Business Administration may choose from the following available minors:

  • Accounting
  • Business Administration (general)
  • Entrepreneurship (Student must attend a mandatory workshop to get information about this minor. Dates available at the Lavin Entrepreneurship Center.)
  • Finance
  • Information Systems
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Real Estate

Students who are majoring in any area of Business Administration, International Business, or Hospitality and Tourism Management may minor in Business with some adjusted requirements. See the requirements of the minor or meet with a business advisor for more information.

Students who meet the requirements for the minor should come to the Business Advising Center (EBA 448) to declare the minor. Students who do not meet the GPA requirement may waitlist for the minor. The waitlist is processed each semester during the declaration period, which can be found in the "Important Dates" section of the admissions page.

Download the Minor Application and the requirements of the minor.

For course information, please view the Course Catalog for the list of courses offered and the Syllabi Collection for additional course details. 

Choose a Program

These seven core courses will provide a solid foundation in each of the key business disciplines. Students who have earned a bachelor's degree in a business-related field may have the opportunity to waive one core course with prior approval from their Graduate Advisor. A second core class may also be waived if a student successfully passes the relevant Challenge Exam. Speak with an advisor for more information.

  • BA 623 Statistical Analysis
  • BA 624 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
  • BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting
  • BA 626 Business Economics
  • BA 627 Marketing
  • BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management
  • BA 629 Financial Management

After completion of the seven core classes, students will take a Business Strategy course. This course can be completed once all core classes have been finished (BA 623 – BA 629) and can be taken in the final semester of the program if desired.

  • BA 630 Business Strategy
All students are required to complete a total of 18 elective units. For more information on what electives you may take please see the document below. Earning an MBA Specialization is optional. Students who wish to specialize in a specific area of study will be required to take a minimum of 12 units (four classes) in their chosen area of emphasis. Students may specialize in only one area of study. For a listing of the specific courses recommended for each of the specializations, please visit the links provided below.

Electives
Accounting Specialization, 2014 and after
Entrepreneurship Specialization, 2014 and after
Finance Specialization, 2014 and after
Health Services Administration Specialization, 2014 and after
Information Systems Specialization, 2014 and after
International Business Specialization, 2014 and after
Management Specialization, 2014 and after
Marketing Specialization, 2014 and after
Project Management Specialization, 2014 and after
Supply Chain Management Specialization, 2014 and after
MBA students are given the option to either take the Business Consulting course (BA 795) or complete a thesis (BA 799A). Students who choose to take BA 795 should submit the BA 795 Reservation Form to Graduate Business Programs office by the fifth week in the semester prior to their anticipated graduation date. Information on the thesis option is available on the Graduate Affairs website.

These seven core courses will provide a solid foundation in each of the key business disciplines. Please note that the core courses have been updated with new numbers and names beginning Fall 2014.

Old Courses New Courses
BA 650 Financial Reporting & Analysis I BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting
BA 651 Organizational Behavior BA 624 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
BA 652 Statistical Analysis BA 623 Statistical Analysis
BA 653 Managerial Economics BA 626 Business Economics
BA 655 Marketing BA 627 Marketing
BA 662 Operations Management BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management
BA 665 Financial Management I BA 629 Financial Management

Once you have been admitted to the MBA program, you must take the graduate-level core course. It is advisable for students to take the core classes as early as possible during their studies at SDSU. You may not be able to enroll in certain graduate level courses until you have completed a core course.

 

A. Corporate Responsibility:

These courses aim to help you develop a deep understanding and appreciation of the legal, ethical and social context in which management decisions are made. You will consider businesses' legal, social and ethical responsibilities to internal and external stakeholders such as stockholders, employees, customers, and the communities where the corporation does business.

Choose ONE of the following courses:

  • ACCTG 681 Seminar in Regulatory & Management Controls
  • FIN 604 Legal Environment for Executives
  • MIS 755 Information Systems Security Management
  • MGT 722 Seminar in Business Ethics and Social Institutions
  • MGT 746 Seminar in Corporate Governance

B. Management of Technology:

These courses aim to develop an understanding of the key issues and trends in business' use of technology and data, information, and knowledge for decision making and competitive advantage.

Choose ONE of the following courses:

  • MIS 688 Information Systems in Organizations
  • MIS 691 Decision Support Systems
 

All students are required to complete a total of 18 elective units. If all core classes were waived, a total of 21 elective units must be completed. Earning an MBA Specialization is optional. Students who wish to specialize in a specific area of study will be required to take a minimum of 12 units (four classes) in their chosen area of emphasis. Students may specialize in only one area of study. For a listing of the specific courses recommended for each of the specializations, please visit the links provided below.

Accounting Specialization
Entrepreneurship Specialization
Finance Specialization
Health Services Administration Specialization
Information Systems Specialization
International Business Specialization
Management Specialization
Marketing Specialization
Project Management Specialization
Real Estate Specialization
Supply Chain Management Specialization

Students who do not intend to specialize in one area of study or who want to take classes outside their area of emphasis will take graduate level business electives of their choosing. Electives are considered to be any 500-level or above course in the College of Business departments (Accountancy, Finance, Management, Marketing, and Management Information Systems). Please note that students may take a maximum of six units of 500-level courses. All additional units must be taken in 600-level or higher courses.

 

MBA students are given the option to either take the capstone course for the MBA program (BA 795) or complete a thesis (BA 799A).

Students who choose to take BA 795 should submit the BA 795 Reservation Form to Graduate Business Programs office by the fifth week in the semester prior to their anticipated graduation date.

Information on the thesis option is available on the Graduate Affairs website.

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

All courses listed on the official program of study
All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

MBA Program of Study

MBA Program POS Fall 2014 and After (pdf)

MBA Sample Degree Plans

Working 40 Hours (pdf)

Working 0-20 Hours (pdf)

Want to Learn More About a Specific Class?

Are you curious about the learning outcomes of a class, which books are typically used, and which projects are typically required? Use the Syllabi Collection to learn more about courses taught in previous semesters at SDSU.

Join us for a Class

Simply fill out the form and attend a class. An advisor will call you to see which class subject you would prefer to audit and at which time of day and day of the week.

SDSU MBA Thematic Structure

The MBA Program is structured around the theme of Managing the Firm’s Life Cycle

  1. Management must guide the firm’s transition from startup to growth to a long-lived publicly-traded or privately-held enterprise, i.e., manage the firm’s life cycle.
  2. Management must choose the firm’s corporate strategy – corporate structure combination that best fits its operating environment.
  3. Management of strategy – structure – environment nexus requires management to continually address the following three sets of questions:
    • Business Strategy: Which markets should the firm serve? How should it compete in its served markets?
    • Financial Strategy: What is the firm’s funding need to compete in its served markets? What are the sources composition, and terms on which funds are acquired?
    • Implementation Strategy: How does the firm design its organization, i.e. coordinate its people, organization architecture, routines, and culture to successfully implement its business and financial strategy?

The courses in the MBA Program are designed to address these questions. They are taught both in lecture and case study formats. Both formats draw upon examples and case studies that span different markets and industries – both domestic and international – and different stages of the firm’s life cycle.

MBA Graduation Requirements

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

MSA Program Requirements

The Master of Science in Accountancy (MSA) degree is open to students with bachelor's degrees in any discipline. The MSA program requires students complete at least ten courses (30 semester units) beyond the core business prerequisite/accounting classes. Students who have fulfilled the core business/accounting prerequisites generally complete the program in 12-18 months. Students without prior academic studies in business can expect to spend 18-24 months in the program. All students are expected to have completed Introductory Financial and Managerial Accounting prior to beginning the MSA program.

Official MSA Programs of Study (POS) are determined by an MSA Adviser based on individual student goals. Contact an MSA Advisor for more information.

In addition to completing the 10 classes for a particular MSA specialization, students must complete specific core business classes. The SDSU Graduate Business Program may waive core business classes for students coming into the program that have completed equivalent undergraduate courses in the last seven years with a grade of “B” or better.

The following core business prerequisites that have not been met prior to enrolling in the MSA program are expected to be satisfied by completing graduate courses at SDSU:

  • BA 623: Statistical Analysis (undergraduate equivalent: statistical analysis for business)
  • BA 624: Organizational Behavior and Leadership (undergraduate equivalent: management and organizational Behavior)
  • BA 625: Financial and Management Accounting (undergraduate equivalent: financial and managerial accounting)
  • BA 626: Business Economics (undergraduate equivalent: microeconomics and macroeconomics)
  • BA 629: Financial Management (undergraduate equivalent: fundamentals of finance)

English Proficiency: Writing or composition course at a university where English is the primary language of instruction.

Note: Students with an undergraduate degree in business from an AACSB Accredited university in the United States of America will have likely satisfied this entire set of prerequisites. See the SDSU Graduate Bulletin for course descriptions.

AIS
Nancy Jones, SSE-2420, (619) 594-5331, njones@mail.sdsu.edu

Financial Reporting
(students with last names A-M)
Janie Chang, SSE-3445, (619) 594-8383, jchang@mail.sdsu.edu

(students with last names N-Z)
Gun-Ho Joh, SSE-2437, (619) 594-2716, gun.joh@sdsu.edu

Tax
Steve Gill, SSE-3435, (619) 594-6273, sgill@mail.sdsu.edu

General Advisors
(students with last names A-M)
Sarah Mercado, EBA-448, (619) 594-1008, sarah.mercado@sdsu.edu

(students with last names N-Z)
Kristie Dock, EBA-448, (619) 594-4188, kdock@mail.sdsu.edu

Accounting Information Systems (AIS)

The MSA-AIS specialization provides students with an academic curriculum that integrates accounting and information systems. MSA-IS students developed the knowledge and skills to become accountants with expertise in information systems and business process management. The MSA-AIS specialization is designed primarily for students interested in pursuing careers in AIS related positions in internal audit, assurance services, information technology auditing, and consulting. The MSA-AIS specialization prepares students to take the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) exam, the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) exam, and the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam.

AI Specialization Overview (pdf)

Financial Reporting (FR)

The MSA-FR specialization provides students with an academic curriculum that focuses on enhancing the quality of information for business decision-making, with an emphasis on developing the communication and problem-solving skills to responsibly contribute to financial reporting processes. MSA-FR students develop a framework for financial reporting grounded in the principles of measurement, disclosure, control, and assurance. Students also have the flexibility to explore topics such as financial statement analysis, accounting theory and research, accounting information systems, corporate finance, and assurance services that transcend traditional financial statement audits. The MSA-FR specialization is designed primarily for students interested in pursuing financial reporting careers in assurance services and corporate industry, although it is flexible enough to allow students to customize their graduate accounting coursework to meet specific career objectives. The MSA-FR specialization prepares students to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam, Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exam, and Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam.

FR Specialization Overview (pdf)

Taxation (TAX)

The MSA-TAX specialization provides students with an academic curriculum that incorporates a wide variety of topics and issues predominately focused on U.S. Federal income taxation. MSA-TAX students develop knowledge and skills in tax compliance and planning for individuals, corporations, partnerships (and other business entities), multistate taxation, international taxation, tax research, and financial reporting for income taxes. The MSA-TAX specialization is designed primarily for students interested in pursuing taxation related careers in public accounting firms and corporate industry. MSA-TAX specialization prepares students to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam and Enrolled Agent (EA) exam.

Tax Specialization Overview (pdf)

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

MSIS Program Requirements

Flexible Curriculum

The MSIS program is designed to be flexible, so you can learn what you need to build the career you want. Your program of study can be adjusted to account for your background and experience. The curriculum includes a "career track" element – an opportunity to customize your course work to align with your career goals. There are several "career track" options suggested below, but if you have a particular technology or domain interest you can work with your academic adviser to define a customized career-track emphasis. This can include courses from the College of Business Administration or other Colleges across the SDSU campus.

In addition to the required courses in the programs, students must complete the following pre-requisite courses. If you have taken these courses before at an AACSB accredited school and earned a B or better in the last five years, you may be able to waive these courses with the approval of your adviser.

Course Number Course Title Units
BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting 3
BA 627 Marketing 3
BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management 3

Required IS Technology Core Courses (select 9 units)

Course Number Course Title Units
MIS 686 Enterprise Data Management 3
MIS 687 Business Data Communications 3
MIS 691 Decision Support Systems 3
MIS 695 Business Systems Analysis and Design 3
MIS 697 Project Planning and Development 3
MIS 752 Seminar in Supply Chain and Enterprise Resource Planning 3
IS TECHNOLOGY UNITS (TOTAL): 9

Required IS Management & Analytics Core Courses (select 9 units)

Course Number Course Title Units
MIS 688 Information Systems and Strategies in Organizations 3
MIS 748 Seminar in Applied Multivariate Analytics 3
MIS 749 Business Analytics 3
MIS 750 Strategic Project Management 3
MIS 755 Information Systems Security Management 3
BA 623 Statistical Analysis 3
IS MANAGEMENT & ANALYTICS UNITS (TOTAL): 9

Open Elective (3 units)

Course Number Course Title Units
  Choose course with help of Faculty Advisor 3

Career Track Courses (12 Units)

Working with your adviser, you will decide on a career-track interest and design your program of study to include courses relevant to your career objectives. These courses can be from within the College of Business Administration or from other colleges at SDSU. (See the section Career Tracks below for a description of several suggested career track options.)

Complete Plan A or Plan B Courses (3 Units)

You must complete either Plan A (thesis option) or Plan B (directed readings and comprehensive examination). You will take one of the following courses, depending on which option you choose. Your adviser will assist you in determining the best choice for you.

Plan Course Number Course Title Units
A BA 799A Thesis Research 3
B MIS 790 Directed Readings in MIS 3
PLAN A OR PLAN B UNITS (TOTAL): 3

The ability to direct your program of study toward an area of interest to you is a key feature of the MSIS program. As noted above, twelve units of study are to be chosen based on a career or domain interest that you determine in consultation with your adviser.

The following suggested career tracks are provided to assist you in planning your program of study. You may follow one of these tracks or create a program tailored to your own objectives.

Management Information Systems

(students with last names A-M)
Aaron Elkins, SSE 3367, (619) 594-0275, aelkins@mail.sdsu.edu

(students with last names N-Z)
Murray Jennex, SSE 3206, (619) 594-3734, mjennex@mail.sdsu.edu

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

Specialized Programs (self-support)

The program curriculum offers an integrated blend of theory and practice, and provides a general management emphasis well-suited to your needs as a mid-career executive. Courses are structured sequentially so that faculty can build upon the concepts and skills presented in preceding courses. Teaching methodologies vary with subject matter and may include classroom lectures, outside reading, case discussions, simulations, and individual and small group projects. Many course assignments allow you to immediately apply concepts to situations in your own organizations.

A total of 48 units of course work is required for the degree. First-year courses develop a solid foundation in traditional business disciplines and introduce you to the core principles. Second-year course work creates an awareness of the environments in which businesses operate, provides a comprehensive understanding of organizations, develops the skills essential to working successfully with people in organizations, and provides a strategic context for business decision making.

First Year Courses

  • Management of Organizations and Human Resources
  • Statistics for Business Decisions
  • Executive Financial Accounting
  • Executive Managerial Accounting
  • Managerial Marketing
  • Strategic Financial Management
  • Competitive Analysis
  • Business in the Global Environment

Second Year Courses

  • Executive Entrepreneurship
  • Social Responsibility: Business Law
    Legal and Ethical Environment of Business
  • Strategic Management
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Seminar in Executive Negotiations
  • The Global Financial Environment
  • Executive Leadership
  • New Product Innovation
    Corporate Governance
  • Launching a High-Risk Business

Schedule: Designed to Fit Your Busy Life

We understand how busy your schedule can be. Therefore, the EMBA program courses are scheduled to make the most efficient use of your time. Classes meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, approximately every other week for 21 months.

Visit the EMBA Academics page for more details on the schedule.

 

The curriculum is composed of core MBA courses tailored to the sports industry; a set of sports industry-specific courses selected to meet the demands of the modern sports marketplace; and a 6-month, full-time consulting project with a sports organization that meets the student's career goals.

The most valuable feature of the SDSU Sports MBA program is the core MBA curriculum provided for the students, as this program is an AACSB accredited graduate business degree. The MBA core courses are business focused, heavily quantitative, and taught by some of the top faculty within the SDSU College of Business Administration. When applicable, members of the faculty cater the presentation of traditional business concepts to sports business, and provide students with analytical tools applicable to the sports industry. While laying the foundation of a solid graduate business education, these courses are supplemented with sports-specific case studies and executive guest lecturers drawn from sports organizations.

Courses and Descriptions

Statistical Analysis, taught by former Associate Dean Dr. Jim Lackritz, introduces new SMBA students to the principles of statistics as they apply to sports business. Students in this intensive course are expected to both run and interpret statistical information in sports-specific contexts to mimic real life decision-making processes used by leaders in the industry. Dr. Lackritz combines his own research in sports business with texts like Moneyball to provide SMBA students with the foundation for critical thought in the sports industry. Although this is a rigorous course, Dr. Lackritz breaks the ice at the beginning of each class with his “What’s new in the world of sports and statistics” segment, in which the class collectively discusses the latest sports business issues. In this course, students look at issues facing sports organizations through a statistical lens; for example, how to measure concession stand wait times at sporting events or how athletes can be evaluated against their peers looking at undervalued traits.

 

Dr. Amy Randel challenges the SMBA cohort to think critically about all aspects of interpersonal communication and organization within the workplace and how varying approaches can affect work performance and cohesion. The class is introduced to various theories and strategies associated with leadership styles, as students use these skills to analyze case studies on both successful and unsuccessful businesses. These skills are further applied through the course’s final project in which students provide analysis and feedback based on survey data and primary research for a local sports organization. Past projects have included companies such as Sun Diego Boardshop, the US Olympic Training Center, and the San Diego Padres.

Dr. David DeBoskey’s course focuses on both financial and managerial accounting principles while progressing into further analysis of financial statements. Students learn the accounting language with the expectation that when they finish the course, they’re capable of making sound financial decisions in management roles. An annual guest speaker to the class is the CFO of the San Diego Padres who speaks about all of the finances related to a professional sports team. Class projects include financial statement analysis of sports teams and apparel companies as well as NCAA conference realignment evaluation studies.

Financial Management I is the first of two courses that exposes students to the fundamental principles of corporate finance, taught by Professor Frank Ryan. This course discusses how managers use financial statements, engage in financial planning, value cash flows, understand risk, make long-term investment decisions, and how to make both long- and short-term financing decisions. Applying recently-acquired knowledge from their Accounting class, students learn about the decision-making processes that shape balance sheets and income statements. Once the groundwork has been laid, students apply these principles to analyze sports business topics such as franchise valuation, stadium financing, personal seat licenses, athlete salaries, and more. This course provides a firm understanding of financial concepts needed to elevate professionals interesting in working in upper levels of management within a sports organization.

Sports marketing is taught by visiting professor, Dr. Vassilis Dalakas (@DrSportBusiness), who provides an in-depth introduction to the principles of marketing and how they apply within the sports business realm. To teach sports marketing effectively, Dr. Dalakas focuses heavily on corporate partnerships and sponsorship in the world of sports, and specializes in fan behavior and the fan experience. While his lectures build a foundation of the core sports marketing concepts through various examples from sports and media, Dr. Dalakas includes real-world experience in the course as well, with student projects that have include a sponsorship activation plan presented to a PGA event and its main sponsors, an analysis of EPL vs. NFL/NBA team branding, and a sponsorship deck for an auto racing team.

Students in Sports Economics are taught by SDSU College of Business Administration Associate Dean Dr. David Ely. The course uses the sports industry to illustrate the applications of microeconomic principles, macroeconomic concepts, and analytical tools used in business decision making. Students learn to apply industrial organization theory to analyze sports business models and related issues when evaluating local markets for teams and calculating the value of sports franchises. The course includes vibrant debates on sports economics issues chosen each semester by the class. Each team must support its position on a sports-related subject using economic reasoning and principles. Discussion topics have recently included stadium financing, team relocation, player salaries, athlete representation, and arena naming rights deals.

Throughout this course, Dr. Bruce Reining shares his broad range of knowledge on topics related to the managerial concepts and quantitative methods associated with the design, execution and management of operations and supply chain systems. Students are provided countless hands-on opportunities in using Excel, Google Analytics, and SAP software to replicate real-life business situations. The course teaches students to model solutions relating to project scheduling, inventory management, demand forecasting and queue management. Group presentations are included in the course as students are able to discuss contemporary issues in sports management such as corporate social responsibility and stadium-based data networks, as well as how emerging technologies, such as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) or software platforms such as Salesforce are making an impact in the world of sport.

Dr. John Francis leads this course, which studies the theories and trends that shape the evolving relationships between sports organizations and their fans. With examples drawn from all segments of sports business, this course is intended to give students a foundation of basic business principles that can be applied to the sports industry.

While students complete the bulk of the core MBA in their first semester, the summer session and fall semester courses feature a more sports-focused classroom experience with a heavy emphasis on developing practical skills designed to be implemented once the student enters the industry as a graduate consultant in the final semester. During this portion of the program, a number of guest lecturers and visiting industry professionals work with students to complement the syllabi of courses taught by SDSU College of Business faculty.

Marketing professor Dr. Andrew Baker focuses this course on preparing students to be both excellent consumers and producers of marketing research. After completing this course, students will possess the knowledge needed to be capable designers and analysts of basic marketing research projects in order to solve business problems typical in various sports marketing contexts. Students will learn and use first hand sports research tools such as SPSS, Nielsen Market Segmentation, Scarborough, PrimeLingo, and more used by sports organizations around the globe. In addition, students are exposed to popular contemporary marketing research and analysis techniques such as conjoint analysis to identify optimal product/service bundles and neural networks to engage in data-driven marketing segmentation. All steps of the research process are also conducted in the real world by student teams acting as "consultants" for a sports-related business.

This is a new course in the program curriculum, and it combines two units taught by program alumni. For the first unit, program director Scott Minto (SMBA ’06) leads the class on an international excursion to the Dominican Republic to study the host of labor relations, social issues, and economic impact of baseball’s presence in the country. The other two units of the course are taught by Steve Gera (SMBA ’07). Gera, a former U.S. Marine and NFL coach who is currently an entrepreneur and high performance consultant to major sports organizations. This segment of the course challenges students to develop a personal leadership plan as they seek careers in sports business, studying examples of great coaches, general managers, military officers, and C-level executives. The instructor uses case studies, articles, and texts to analyze and compare leadership principles in sport against those within the corporate, military, and cultural sectors. A highlight of the module is the students’ participation in a Leadership Reaction Course, in which the MBA candidates’ leadership small-unit leadership skills are evaluated by active-duty U.S. Marines from nearby Camp Pendleton.

This course is taught by Dr. Joe Belch, chair of the Marketing department in the College of Business Administration and co-author of the leading textbook in Integrated Marketing Communications. It focuses on the development, implementation and evaluation of marketing strategy for sports organizations and companies. The emphasis will be on developing skills and gaining experience in making strategic decisions regarding the direction of the firm's marketing efforts. Attention is also focused on how strategic marketing contributes to the development and implementation of an organizations overall business strategy.

Dr. Bruce Reinig takes a hands-on approach to teaching data management techniques and statistical software to conduct business analytics initiatives and evaluate their performance through a cost-benefit analysis. Students will work on projects that include data collection and preparation, application of techniques such as logistic regression, k-nearest neighbors and cluster analysis (among others), validating their results, and making implementation recommendations. Past students have used the techniques covered in this course to model home field advantages in NCAA basketball and football, analyze Olympic decathlon data to identify underlying performance constructs, predict whether a team will win, lose or tie a sporting competition, and to perform market segmentation to identify opportunities for expansion into new markets.

In Frank Ryan's second course within the Sports MBA curriculum, students build upon the foundation set by Financial Management I. They are expected to understand the impetus behind major financial deals in the sports world, such as stadium financing and franchise valuation. In order to prepare students for tasks they will face in the sports industry, this course is heavily based in Excel.

SMBA students work with a visiting faculty member for an immersion into sports law and how it relates to the owners, agents, sponsors and athletes who operate in the sports industry. The course covers nearly all aspects of sports business, including league structures, collective bargaining agreements, player compensation, and college athletics, among other topics. As part of this in-depth course, students are paired off to participate in a simulated player contract negotiation.

After completing the 12-month classroom portion of the Sports MBA curriculum, students are prepared to work with a sports organization on a full-time basis. The MBA candidates have a faculty mentor oversee their work during their final semester, with the goal of providing their host organization with a comprehensive consulting report on a specific sports business field at the end of the term. The courses in which the student is enrolled represent a six unit course load, which is carried remotely by many students who choose to pursue a consultancy outside of San Diego. Classes do not meet during this term, so students are encouraged to pursue full-time job opportunities during this portion of the program.

BA 780 Field Studies in Business:

6 Month Internship

BA 795 Integrative Business Analysis:

Final MBA Thesis Report

Concurrent Programs

MBA/JD Concurrent Degree

Concurrent programs leading to MBA and Juris Doctor degrees are offered through SDSU's partnerships with California Western School of Law (CWSL) and Thomas Jefferson School of Law (TJSL). These concurrent degree programs are designed for students interested in working in fields where law and business converge. Students are expected to apply first to the law program (at either Cal Western or Thomas Jefferson) and then apply to the SDSU MBA program during their first year of law school.

SDSU in partnership with California Western School of Law:

The concurrent degree program allows students to earn a JD from CWSL and an MBA from SDSU in as few as eight semesters of study. Students spend their first year in the JD program at CWSL. Then they join an entering class at SDSU and spend two full time semesters at SDSU as part of an MBA first-year class. For the remainder of the program, students take classes at both SDSU and CWSL. Each school grants credit for nine to twelve units taken at the other school. You must complete the requirements for admission and graduation at both. Degrees are awarded concurrently.

SDSU in partnership with Thomas Jefferson School of Law:

Students spend their first year in the JD program at TJSL and the second year at SDSU. Classes are taken at both institutions the last two years of the programs. Each institution grants credit for up to 12 units taken at the other school, thus eliminating at least one semester from the time it would normally take to complete these two programs separately. Students must complete the requirements for admission and graduation at both institutions. Degrees are awarded concurrently.

Students in the JD/MBA program follow the business curriculum outlined below:

  • Core (21 units):

    • BA 623 Statistical Analysis
    • BA 624 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
    • BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting
    • BA 626 Business Economics
    • BA 627 Marketing
    • BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management
    • BA 629 Financial Management
  • Strategy Course (3 units):

    • Business Strategy
  • Electives (6 units)

  • Culminating Experience (3 units):

    • BA 795 Business Consulting OR BA 799 Thesis

MBA/MA Latin American Studies Concurrent Degree

SDSU's College of Business Administration and Center for Latin American Studies offer a three-year concurrent program of study leading to a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies (MBA/MA LAS). The objective of the concurrent program is to offer preparation in the fields of business administration and Latin American studies for the purpose of providing the knowledge and skills necessary to promote and engage in business relationships with the Latin American community in Latin America or in the United States.

Students in the MBA/MA LAS program follow the curriculum outlined below:

  • Core Courses (21 units):

    • BA 623 Statistical Analysis
    • BA 624 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
    • BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting
    • BA 626 Business Economics
    • BA 627 Marketing
    • BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management
    • BA 629 Financial Management
  • Strategy Course (3 units):

    • BA 630 Business Strategy
  • Business Courses (15 units):

    • FIN 654 Seminar in International Bus. Finance
    • MGT 710 Seminar in World Bus. Environment
    • MGT 723 Seminar in International Strategic Mgmt.
    • MGT 731 Seminar in Strategic Mgmt. of Tech.
    • MKTG 769 Seminar in International Marketing
  • Courses with Latin American Content (24 units):

    • LATAM 600 - Introduction to Latin American Studies
    • LATAM 601 - Sem. on Methodology of LA Studies
  • Electives

  • MGT 798 Special Study (3 units)

  • BA 799A - Thesis (3 units)

Certificate Program (through CES)

Executive Financial Planner Certificate Program Requirements

Highlights

The goal of the Executive Financial Planner Advanced Certificate program is to enable experienced financial services professionals to understand the content material of financial planning with the goal of providing advice based solely on the interests of their clients.

  • 18-month program.
  • Convenient campus location.
  • Taught by prominent SDSU faculty and seasoned professionals who are experts in financial planning, taxation, estate planning, insurance management and investments.
  • Upon successful completion, participants will be awarded an SDSU Executive Financial Planner Advanced certificate.
  • These courses are taught at the graduate level. If a student becomes a candidate for the Master of Science degree with a concentration in Financial and Tax Planning, courses in this program may count toward their degree with the permission of their adviser. There is a seven year limit on all courses at the time a degree is granted, however.

Federal Taxation of Individuals

ACCT503 Taxation of individuals, including income, deductions, credits, social security taxes and property transactions.

Individual Insurance Management

FIN522 Economic, legal, social and ethical considerations of individual, business and group insurance, including life, health, property, liability and social insurance.

Financial and Retirement Planning

FIN657 Decision-making process and theory of individual financial needs. Retirement planning including social security. Education planning. Financial strategies that aid in meeting family goals.

Seminar in Estate Planning

FIN705 Identification and analysis of those aspects of federal and state law affecting estate planning and taxation.

Seminar in Investments

FIN651 Characteristics of financial markets and instruments; pricing individual securities; portfolio selection and analysis; measurement of risk.

Financial Planning Practicum

FIN 590 Preparation of family financial plans using comprehensive cases and/or real financial data. Financial planning software, counseling and communication skills, behavioral finance, client psychology, practice standards, discipline and ethics.

Classes Meet Weekly, Tuesday Afternoons, 2:30 to 6:00 PM
Location: On Campus at SDSU

Class Date
Individual Insurance (FIN 522) October 4, 2016 – January 3, 2017
Financial & Retirement Planning (FIN 657) January 3, 2017 – March 28, 2017
Estate Planning (FIN 705) March 28, 2017 – June 20, 2017
Investments (FIN 651) June 20, 2017 – September 12, 2017
Federal Taxation (Acct 503) September 12, 2017 – December 5, 2017
Financial Planning Practicum (FIN 590) is the last course. It is taught three times each year (after the completion of the other five class sequence).

Disclosure: SDSU intends to offer the complete series of courses. However, actual offerings of courses depend upon sufficient enrollment and instructor availability. All courses are also offered at the SDSU main campus. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. awards the CFP® certification mark only upon meeting their complete set of requirements. See their Guide to CFP® Certification online.